Virtual Cinema

Through our Virtual Cinema program, we're excited to bring you opportunities to watch new release titles on your home screen while directly supporting Amherst Cinema.

When you watch these films at home, the cost of the digital "ticket" is split between the film distributor and Amherst Cinema—just like when you buy a ticket at the box office.

These films will be available for a set "run," with the end date listed on the film page. Click a film below for more information and to watch these Virtual Cinema selections.

Questions? Problems? Please reference this Virtual Cinema FAQ.

Looking for ways to enrich the Virtual Cinema experience? Check our Virtual Events page for online Q&As and seminars with filmmakers, experts, and film subjects.


Virtual Cinema is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Additional support provided by:

 

 

A hardworking Maltese fisherman, Jesmark is faced with an agonizing choice. He can repair his leaky luzzu—a traditional, multicolored wooden fishing boat—in the hopes of eking out a meager living at sea, or he can decommission it in exchange for an EU payout and cast his lot with a sinister black-market operation.
An unexpected love triangle, a failed seduction, and a chance encounter with the past. Propelled by coincidence and imagination, and guided by love’s gentle current, acclaimed director Ryūsuke Hamaguchi returns with an enchanting triptych that spins mundane encounters into a world of infinite possibilities. A New York Times Critic's Pick!
Decades after covering up his classmate’s murder, Michael (Michael Greyeyes) has moved on from his reservation and fractured past. When a man who shares his violent secret seeks vengeance, Michael goes to great lengths to protect his new life with his wife (Kate Bosworth) and boss (Jesse Eisenberg) from the demons of his past. A New York Times Critic's Pick!
In her debut film, director Qiong Wang builds a riveting portrait of her own family reckoning with the lasting impact of China's one-child policy.
Is the technology of photography and motion pictures inherently racist? For PRISM, Belgian filmmaker An van. Dienderen invited Rosine Mbakam, from Cameroon, and Eléonore Yameogo from Burkina Faso, to work together on a film in which the differences in their skin color, and experiences as filmmakers, serve as points-of-departure to explore this provocative question.
Acclaimed director Vitaly Mansky (UNDER THE SUN) is at home with a man who helped to shape the 20th century: Mikhail Gorbachev. This intimate portrait finds Gorbachev living alone in an empty house outside Moscow, still carrying the burdens of his past.
Filmmaker Rosine Mbakam paints a portrait of Delphine, a young Cameroonian girl living in Belgium. Like so many of her generation, Delphine left the oppression of a patriarchal society looking for a new life in Europe—only to find herself enmeshed in sexual exploitation of a different kind.
Blues and folk singer Karen Dalton was a prominent figure in 1960s New York. Idolized contemporaries like Bob Dylan and younger musicians like Nick Cave, Karen discarded the traditional trappings of success and led an unconventional life until her early death. This film uses Karen’s dulcet melodies and interviews with loved ones to build a rich portrait of this singular woman and her hauntingly beautiful voice. A New York Times Critic's Pick!